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Glute Muscles

August 23, 2018

The gluteal muscles are a group of muscles which make up the buttocks

 

 

Location:

Back of the hips, linked to the hip joint.

Attach to the pelvis and the femur.

 

 

Components:

  1. Gluteus Maximus – largest component in terms of size and depth. This doesn’t work unless demands are high (e.g. running, deep stretches).

  2. Gluteus Minimus – smallest component in terms of size and depth. Partly covered by the Gluteus Maximus

  3. Gluteus Medius – in the middle of the other two glutes in terms of size and depth. Partly covered by the Gluteus Maximus.

     

Functions:

  • Work opposite the adductor muscles on the front and inside of the hips.

  • Internally rotate

  • Externally rotate

  • Abduct the hip

  • Flex and extend the leg at the hip.

  • Prevent adduction - contract and stabilise the hip when walking/running.

  • NB. Large amounts of walking, running or cycling can create tight glutes / hips.

     

Yoga implications:

  • Lotus / Half Lotus (Padmasana) - As the glutes prevent adduction they can cause limitations

  • Cobblers pose (Baddha Konasana) - As the glutes prevent adduction they can cause limitations

  • Warrior I (Virabhadrasana I) – the gluteus maximus resists flexion at the hip joint in front of the leg, supporting the body weight and stopping the hip dropping too low.

  • Backbends – Most people will naturally tighten the buttocks to help extend the hip joint when pushing up into a backbend.

 

Further reading:

This muscle group has an impact on the hips. Read more about the Hip Joint in a separate article.

You can also read separate articles on other muscles around the hip joint:

  1. The Quadriceps

  2. The Hamstrings

  3. The Adductors

  4. The Gluteals (this article is one of the topics in the series)

  5. The Deep Six Lateral Rotators

  6. The Psoas

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